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A CONVERSATION WITH ALEX MULLINS

SINCE ALEX MULLINS STARTED HIS EPONYMOUS MENSWEAR LABEL FOR THE SPRING 2013 SEASON, HE HAS GAINED PLENTY OF ATTENTION FOLLOWING HIS PLAYFUL AND DISTINCTIVE COLLECTIONS. THE CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS AND ROYAL COLLEGE OF ART GRADUATE HAS HAD THE CHANCE TO LEARN FROM THE LIKES OF JEREMY SCOTT, DIANE VON FURSTENBERG, AND ALEXANDER MCQUEEN. THE LONDON-NATIVE DESIGNER RECENTLY ACCEPTED TO ANSWER OUR QUESTIONS FOR AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW. UNCONVENTIONAL YET ONE OF THE MOST PROMISING DESIGNERS, HE TELLS US ABOUT HIS BACKGROUND, HIS RECENT SUCCESS STORY AND HIS LATEST COLLECTION. SEE INSIDE THE MIND OF ALEX MULLINS, A GENUINE TALENT TO WATCH CLOSELY.

THE FINE PRINT: Alex Mullins, we are delighted to interview a man of so many talents. Starting with your work as a student, you were educated at Central Saint Martins and the Royal College of Art in London. How much of your success do you credit to these schools?

ALEX MULLINS: CSM and RCA were incredible. They helped both shape and control my imagination whilst allowing me to explode my creativity. I developed skills to be able to translate what I see in my head into reality.

TFP: Your AW16 collection is called “Process of Boredom”. Boredom does not necessarily need to be a bad thing, but why choose this name to describe a far from boring collection? How do you materialise the notion of boredom in your garments?

AM: It is not boredom itself but what happens when your mind drifts off. It is a common thought, something anyone can relate to. That is my common goal, to create a second thought, or a developed way of thinking.

TFP: This season, you collaborate with photographer Hazel Gaskin to create photographic textiles. What was the idea behind this partnership, and why did you choose to work with photographs?

AM: The idea was to do the collection in reverse- shoot the campaign first, then put the campaign on the garments. I love the idea of oxymoron, a kind of spoof of real life.

TFP: In general, what does your current fashion work focus on? How is what you are creating unique and how does it showcase you as a designer?

AM: I try to create things that I have not seen before, but that also feel familiar – something obvious, but seen in a new way. Fashion is a lot about the ‘new’ but I think it is just about being objective.

TFP: The use of denim is recurrent in your collections. Can you describe why you love this fabric?

AM: The denim construction is what I love the most. It is so brutal and strong, tough and functional, honest and decorative. I am obsessed with fabric, and how the smell can make you feel. Denim is really reliable and gets better with age.

TFP: As a devoted designer in your creative work, where do you draw your inspiration from when creating your pieces? Do you have a specific research process when you start a new collection?

AM: It is just a gut feeling, then it manifests. I start the ‘doing’ process quite early on as I like my thoughts to come to life. Then I just process and develop, and it snowballs from there.

Text by KEVIN MEUNIER

Photography JESSICA MAHAFFEY